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Crush Live Poker Podcast No. 316 "Hung hands and Healthcare"

Bart HansonBart Hanson Posts: 6,169Administrator, LeadPro
This week Bart reviews hands played from CLP subscriber William Hung and also discusses the GTO approach to healthcare in today's system.

http://www.crushlivepoker.com/podcasts/hung-hands-and-healthcare
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  • RogerHardyRogerHardy Posts: 795Subscriber
    Hey Bart

    Great podcast on healthcare. One question. You talked about buying a cheap plan and then upgrading to a better one if say you got diagnosed with cancer. So lets say you are enrolling now in cheap plan that starts jan 1. then on jan 2 you get diagnosed with cancer. Aren't you stuck on cheap plan for all of 2019 until open enrollment next fall for 2020? Getting cancer isnt a qualifying life event that would let you change plans mid year, is it?
  • Bart HansonBart Hanson Posts: 6,169Administrator, LeadPro
    edited October 2018
    Hey Bart

    Great podcast on healthcare. One question. You talked about buying a cheap plan and then upgrading to a better one if say you got diagnosed with cancer. So lets say you are enrolling now in cheap plan that starts jan 1. then on jan 2 you get diagnosed with cancer. Aren't you stuck on cheap plan for all of 2019 until open enrollment next fall for 2020? Getting cancer isnt a qualifying life event that would let you change plans mid year, is it?

    Yes that is true. There are only certain circumstances where you can enroll within the "special enrollment period." I will clarify that on this week's episode. But one you hit your out of pocket maximum for that year (on bronze plans very close to the deductible) everything would be covered for that year and you could switch to a different plan the next year.


    https://www.healthcare.gov/coverage-outside-open-enrollment/special-enrollment-period/

    Life changes that can qualify you for a Special Enrollment Period
    Changes in household
    You may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period if you or anyone in your household in the past 60 days:

    Got married. Pick a plan by the last day of the month and your coverage can start the first day of the next month.

    Had a baby, adopted a child, or placed a child for foster care. Your coverage can start the day of the event — even if you enroll in the plan up to 60 days afterward.

    Got divorced or legally separated and lost health insurance. Note: Divorce or legal separation without losing coverage doesn’t qualify you for a Special Enrollment Period.

    Died. You’ll be eligible for a Special Enrollment Period if someone on your Marketplace plan dies and as a result you’re no longer eligible for your current health plan.
  • mragemrage Posts: 30Subscriber
    Bart wrote: »
    This week Bart reviews hands played from CLP subscriber William Hung and also discusses the GTO approach to healthcare in today's system.

    http://www.crushlivepoker.com/podcasts/hung-hands-and-healthcare
    Great info, Bart. One question, though. Where is a good place to open an Individual HSA? I am considering Fidelity and Vanguard for my solo 401k, but they don't appear to offer Hsa to individuals. I agree with your approach, even if the cost basis is a bit higher, the triple tax advantage of an HSA should make it the first one to max.
  • Bart HansonBart Hanson Posts: 6,169Administrator, LeadPro
    mrage wrote: »
    Bart wrote: »
    This week Bart reviews hands played from CLP subscriber William Hung and also discusses the GTO approach to healthcare in today's system.

    http://www.crushlivepoker.com/podcasts/hung-hands-and-healthcare
    Great info, Bart. One question, though. Where is a good place to open an Individual HSA? I am considering Fidelity and Vanguard for my solo 401k, but they don't appear to offer Hsa to individuals. I agree with your approach, even if the cost basis is a bit higher, the triple tax advantage of an HSA should make it the first one to max.

    I use HSA Administrators which offers Vanguard funds. All of these custodial HSA firms will charge fees ranging from $25-$50 a year. Just google HSA for Fidelity.

    https://healthsavings.com/
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